User Tools

Site Tools


esmith:db:db

esmith::DB::db

esmith::DB::db - interface to esmith::db databases

In a root terminal you can do the command below if you want to display the up-to-date content perldoc -U esmith::DB::db

SYNOPSIS

Works just like an esmith::DB class except where noted

DESCRIPTION

This module provides an abstracted interface to esmith::db flat-file databases. It will read from and write to esmith::db files and can be safely used right along side esmith::db. This follows the esmith::DB interface and will work as documented there unless otherwise stated.

You should use this instead of esmith::db, and replace any existing esmith::db code with this.

Note for esmith::db users the old concept of a ’type’ is now simply another property.

         my $type = $record->prop(’type’);

replaces db_get_type().

The $record returned by esmith::DB::db subclass is an esmith::DB::db::Record subclass object. See the esmith::DB::db manpage for details on how it is used.

Methods

create

Puts its error on esmith::DB::db→error

     open
     open_local
     as_hash
     reload
     file
     new_record
     get
     get_all
     get_all_by_prop

EXAMPLE

The full docs can be found in esmith::DB and esmith::DB::Record, but here’s a cheat sheet for esmith::config and esmith::db users.

opening the default config

             use esmith::config
             my %config;
             tie %config, ’esmith::config;

Now:

             use esmith::ConfigDB;
             my $config = esmith::ConfigDB->open;

opening a specific config database

             my %config;
             tie %config, ’esmith::config’, $config_file;

Now:

             my $config = esmith::ConfigDB->open($config_file);

creating a new config database

This one’s important. Before you could just tie esmith::config to any file and it would create it for you. Now you have to explicitly create it.

             my %config;
             tie %config, ’esmith::config’, $new_config_file;

Now:

             my $config = esmith::ConfigDB->create($new_config_file);

checking if a record exists

             print "Yep" if exists $config{foo};

now:

             print "Yep" if $config->get(’foo’); # unless of course, ’foo’ is zero

creating a new record

Previously you could just create records on the fly:

             # single value
             $config{foo} = ’whatever’;
             # with properties
             db_set(\%config, ’whatever’, ’sometype’, { with => ’properties’ });

Now you have to explicitly create them:

             # single value
             my $foo = $config->new_record(’foo’);
             $foo->set_value(’foo’);

# with properties

             my %defaults = ( ’type’    => ’sometype’,
                              ’linux’   => ’stable’,
                              ’windows’ => ’stable?’ );
             my $foo = $config->new_record(’foo’, \%defaults);

Note that ’type’ is now just another property.

Here’s a handy “create this if it doesn’t already exist” idiom.

             my $rec = $config->get($key) ││
                       $config->new_record($key);

getting a value

Entries in a database should no longer be thought of as values, but as records.

             my $val = $config{foo};

Now this only works with entries with single value. Things with multiple properties are dealt with differently.

             my $record = $config->get(’foo’);
             my $val = $record->value;

setting a value

             $config{foo} = ’something’;

now

             my $record = $config->get(’foo’);
             $record->set_value(’something’);

getting a property

             my $this = db_get_prop(\%config, ’foo’, ’this’);

now:

             my $foo = $config->get(’foo’);
             my $this = $foo->prop(’this’);

getting & setting properties

             my $val = db_get_prop(\%config, ’foo’, ’some prop’);
             db_set_prop(\%config, ’foo’, ’some prop’ => $new_val);

now:

             my $val = $record->prop(’some prop’);
             $record->set_prop(’some prop’ => $new_val);

get/setting the type

             my $type = db_get_type(\%config, ’foo’);
             db_set_type(\%config, ’foo’, $new_type);

type is now just a property

             my $record = $db->get(’foo’);
             my $type = $record->prop(’type’);
             $record->set_prop(’type’, $new_type);

getting all the properties

             my %props = db_get_prop(\%config, ’foo’);

now

             my %props = $record->props;

AUTHOR

     SME Server Developers <bugs@e-smith.com>
esmith/db/db.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/05 21:48 (external edit)